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Are you frustrated with your doctor?

Doctors and the Healthcare System

Many people are frustrated with the healthcare system and rightfully so. The doctor may not always be to blame however. Many people tell me how they have had doctors who don’t have time to listen or “do anything” for them. Like with anything in life, there are different levels of professionalism, however, there are also many things that go on behind the scenes of medicine that you may not know. Read more at my article on KevinMD.com: Before visiting the doctor, consider these 5 things you may not know.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments section below.

5 Surprising Things You May Not Know About Doctors

Times have definitely changed 1946 Camel Cigarette Ad Source: http://tobacco.stanford.edu/tobacco_main

Times have definitely changed
1946 Camel Cigarette Ad
Source: http://tobacco.stanford.edu/tobacco_main

 

“Oh, you’re my doctor? A woman?”

Who do you picture walking through the exam room door at your new doctor’s office? Is it the Norman Rockwell depiction of an older, jolly looking male with white hair? After residency I was alarmed at how many patients commented on my age and gender:

“<Expletive>, how old are you, 12?” or, “Oh, you’re my doctor? A woman?”

I know that I lived under a rock during my medical training but I am pretty sure Scrubs, the Mindy Project and Grey’s Anatomy were on TV then. (Scrubs is the most realistic medical TV show by the way.) This got me thinking about misconceptions people have about doctors, and I thought I could share a few things you may not know about your favorite neighborhood doc.

1. We are young

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), of the active physicians in the US in 2012, about 60% were under the age of 54. With baby boomers retiring, someone has to take over the roles of older doctors (who by the way, were at some point young too.) Physicians fresh out of residency have had several thousands of hours of experience in addition to seeing several thousands of patients. Yes, while more experience is an advantage, so is knowing about the latest health guidelines and technology. In fact, a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2005, showed that younger physicians are more likely to order necessary tests and appropriately counsel patients on preventive health than their more experienced colleagues.

"Before the Shot" by Norman Rockwell Source nrm.org

“Before the Shot” by Norman Rockwell
Source: nrm.org

2. We exist in female form (Shocking I know!!!)

While 70% of physicians in the US are male, the number of females entering the medical field continues to grow. Not only do females have to jump through the same hoops as their male colleagues when it comes to medical training, they may even have a slight edge. A study done by the University of Montreal showed that female doctors score higher on quality and care measures and are more likely to follow evidenced-based guidelines. Another study showed that female physicians tend to show more empathy and are better listeners. NOTE: This is not meant to bash male physicians. There are very talented male physicians practicing medicine. The whole point is that female physicians are also good at what they do.

3. We are not as rich as you think

It’s true that doctors make a salary that is well above the national average. However, after about 10-15 years of education and training, making little to no money, we find ourselves in hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. It takes about double that amount of time originally invested to repay a debt, which can end up costing more than twice as much due to accrued interest. It’s no wonder why doctors are fighting health care reimbursement cuts. I tell people all the time, don’t become a doctor if you are trying to be rich. Become a doctor because you can’t see yourself doing anything else and you are willing to put in the sacrifice. Believe me, there are a lot of easier ways to become rich.

4. We know more than medical websites

It’s wonderful when people are involved in their own health and want to be informed. While there are many great medical websites out there, there is also a lot of false medical information on the Internet, and believe me, nothing replaces a formal medical education. Doctors learn the information you read about online at an advanced level and take it a step further by applying that information to each individual. A cough in Mr. A who smokes, may be related to something completely different than a cough in Mrs. C who may have other health problems and be taking different medications.

Scrubs: One of the best medical TV shows ever! Source: http://www.tv.com/shows/scrubs/

Scrubs: One of the best medical TV shows ever!
Source: http://www.tv.com/shows/scrubs/

5. We are human

Believe it or not, doctors are people too. I hate getting my blood drawn and I also happen to do a mean robot dance. In all seriousness, doctors have a lot of responsibilities placed on their shoulders, which is why becoming a physician is not easy; we are dealing with human lives after all. That being said, doctors don’t always have all the answers either. It’s called the “practice” of medicine for a reason. Sometimes we have to try a few things and rule some things out, which may require a few tests, additional appointments or even referrals to other physicians.

The stone age has passed…

Regardless of our age, gender, skin color, nationality, student loan debt, USMLE, NBME, board exam, or state license, doctors have all taken an oath. An oath promising to value and respect human life, do no harm, maintain confidentiality and ultimately do what is best for patients and our community.

So the next time a young doctor walks into the room, give her the benefit of the doubt. She may be 20-something, driving a 2000 Toyota, with half of her paycheck paying off student loan debt. If you look hard enough you may see the “age lines” she and the next generation of young doctors acquired through the many sleepless nights and delayed gratification invested in taking care of you and your loved ones.

 

 

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